31 Ultimate Things to Do in California

  • 31 Ultimate Things to Do in California

    Everything you need to see, do, and eat in the Golden State.

    California is the most diverse state in the nation, home to nearly 40 million people, and is geographically bigger than England. It might come as a surprise to tourists, but the state’s capital is actually Sacramento, which is only the sixth-largest city after Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose, San Francisco, and Fresno. Read: it’s really, really big. The state can also be seen as a microcosm for the entire country. There are sprawling mountains, endless beaches, bone-dry deserts, lush farmland, bustling metropolises, and charming small towns. On any given day you can ski, surf, hike, sunbathe, ride a rollercoaster, or sail with whales. As a result, creating an ultimate guide to the state is no simple task. However, the list below represents some of the best of California–its diversity, its beauty, its history, its culture, and its unbeatable fun. Needless to say, if you come to the Golden State and get bored, you’re doing it wrong.

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  • Dive Into History in Chinatown

    WHERE: San Francisco

    If you want to experience real California history, head over to Chinatown in San Francisco. Not only is it the largest Chinatown outside of Asia, but it’s also the oldest Chinatown in the U.S. Some highlights include the  Chinatown Dragon Gate  and the Golden Gate Fortune Cookie Factory . Make it a point of coming on Chinese New Year for epic parades and fireworks.

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  • See the Oldest Surviving Part of Los Angeles on Olvera Street

    WHERE: Los Angeles

    Originally called Wine Street, Olvera is the oldest part of Downtown Los Angeles and home to the Avila Adobe house that was constructed in 1818. Walking the street today, you’ll discover a 44-acre park with a Mexican marketplace, refurbished historic buildings, restaurants, shops, and weekend dance performances.

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  • Wander Through Old Town San Diego

    WHERE: San Diego

    Known as the birthplace of California, Old Town San Diego was the first established European settlement in the state dating back to 1769. The original settlement was a Christian Mission and changed hands between Mexican and Spanish rule over the years. Today, Old Town is home to a historic state park with museums, restored buildings, and classic (possibly haunted) Victorian mansions.

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  • Stride With Stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

    WHERE: Los Angeles

    Along Hollywood Blvd., the Hollywood Walk of Fame is one of the most indelible icons of Tinseltown. The walk consists of brass stars embedded into the pavement and features the biggest celebrities, producers, writers, and directors of film, stage, and screen. The first stars were officially revealed in the early 1960s and today there are more than 2,600 dotting Hollywood Blvd.

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  • Experience Opulence at the Hearst Castle

    WHERE: San Simeon

    In its heyday, the Hearst Castle in San Simeon was a hotspot for celebrities with roaring ’20s parties that catered to everyone from Charlie Chaplin and Clark Gable to Jean Harlow and the Marx Brothers. Built by media mogul William Randolph Hearst between 1919 and 1947, the castle was fictionalized and lampooned in the classic film Citizen Kane . Today, visitors can tour the opulent palace, which features a zoo, a gold leaf Roman pool, and a priceless art collection.

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  • Cross the Golden Gate Bridge

    WHERE: San Francisco

    Opened in 1937, the Golden Gate Bridge is one of the most iconic symbols of San Francisco and California at large. The mile-long suspension bridge connects San Francisco to Marin County and is a stunning display of an engineering marvel. Visitors can cross the bridge on foot, by bicycle, or drive across. Contrary to popular belief, the bridge is not re-painted red every year.

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  • Commune With Nature at Yosemite National Park

    Part of a sprawling park network in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, Yosemite National Park is known for its giant sequoia trees, epic waterfalls, and abundance of wildlife. The park is filled with activities like rock climbing, hiking, mountain biking, and more. Remember, reservations are required to enter the park, so plan ahead.

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  • Crane Your Neck at Redwood National Park

    Traveling towards the northernmost part of the state, you’ll encounter one of the world’s most stunning natural wonders. Redwood National and State Parks is home to the tallest trees on Earth (300-400 feet tall!) and hugs 40 miles of California coastline. There are countless things to see and do including camping, hiking, fishing, and kayaking. But staring at these colossal living monuments will occupy a good amount of your time.

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  • Find Jaw-Dropping Vistas at Big Sur

    One of the most spectacular drives in the world is along Highway 1, which ambles up the coastline between the Pacific Ocean and the jagged mountains and redwood trees en route to Big Sur. The scenery isn’t the only highlight of this drive, if you head down to the beach, you might find herds of barking elephant seals or fluffy sea otters hanging in the kelp beds.

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  • Experience the Bottom of the World in Death Valley

    Known as the hottest place on Earth, Death Valley sits on the eastern edge of California along the border with Nevada. Covering 3.4 million acres, this desert wasteland holds the claim to the lowest elevation on the planet and is filled with jaw-dropping vistas, rolling sand dunes, rocky peaks, and scorching temperatures.

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  • Camp in Joshua Tree

    Just east of Palm Springs is Joshua Tree National Park, named for the Yucca brevifolia trees which a group of Mormons coined to remember the biblical Joshua raising his hands into the sky. Today, the park is a popular site for hiking and camping with hundreds of certified campgrounds strewn across hundreds of thousands of acres.

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  • Witness Greatness in Sport

    California’s weather makes it a prime location for outdoor activities of all kinds, but some of the best sporting action takes place in the massive stadiums in the state’s major cities. Sports fans have their pick of the litter, whether it’s seeing the Lakers, Clippers, Chargers, Rams or Dodgers in Los Angeles; the Giants, 49ers, or Warriors in San Francisco; or the Kings in Sacramento. California is also home to major golf and tennis tournaments, in addition to surf championships, soccer matches, auto, and horse racing.

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  • Explore Your Wild Side at the San Diego Safari Park

    Whether or not you’re a fan of zoos, the San Diego Safari Park is a great way to learn about wildlife without the typical claustrophobic animal cages. The park prides itself on expansive containment areas, allowing its wide range of wildlife to roam (mostly) free. Hopping on the Africa tram will expose you to an array of African animals like giraffes, antelopes, and even rhinoceroses.

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  • Remember Your Childhood at Disneyland

    It all started here in 1955 when Walt Disney himself decided to build a theme park around his Disney animated empire. With constant renovations and updates, Disneyland promises to always have something new–Marvel Land is the latest addition. Other attractions include classics like Tomorrowland, Pirates of the Caribbean, and Space Mountain, and newer areas like Star Wars: Galaxy Edge.

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  • Eat Around the World in Los Angeles

    If you’re looking for the most unique, exciting dining scene in the country, L.A. is your home base. The cuisines from around the world are scattered across the city in neighborhoods like Koreatown, Little Tokyo, Thai Town, Little Ethiopia, and others that highlight the culinary traditions of their respective cultures. Some particular highlights include: n/naka for fine dining Japanese kaiseki cuisine; Jitlada for the spiciest Thai around; Park’s for unbelievably good Korean barbecue; get the best dim sum of your life in the San Gabriel Valley at Sea Harbour ; there’s Guelaguetza for Oaxacan cooking; dozens of mind-blowing taquerias like Sonoratown, Tacos 1986, or Sky’s Gourmet Tacos ; and for Ethiopian delights, head over to Meals by Genet or Merkato.

    Zen Sekizawa

  • Drink All the Wine

    Don’t tell the French, but the best wine in the world is actually made in California (they know ). Up and down the California coast are some of the finest winemakers on the planet and the crown jewels reside in Napa and Sonoma Counties. Of course, the rest of the state is littered with world-class wines as well. Check out the McBride Sisters, the largest Black-owned wine company in the country, Freeman Vineyard & Winery, founded and run by Akiko Freeman (the only Japanese winemaker in the U.S.), or Sandhi, founded by Indian-born sommelier Rajat Parr.

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  • Catch Waves in Malibu

    WHERE: Malibu

    It’s not necessarily the best surfing spot in California, but it might be the most beautiful. Appropriately named,  Surfrider Beach  is part of a stretch of Malibu that includes the Malibu Pier and is a popular point for surfing buffs and beach bums alike. Also, part of Malibu,  Zuma Beach  is next to the popular Point Dume State Beach where surfers and swimmers share the water with sealions.

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  • Ski in Lake Tahoe and Mammoth

    Straddling California and Nevada,  Lake Tahoe  is a summer and winter wonderland for adventure enthusiasts. When the snow is blowing, the surrounding ski resorts offer snowboarders and skiers endless untracked powder. (And when the sun is shining, water sports abound for kayakers, sailors, and volleyball enthusiasts.)

    Nearby Yosemite National Park,  Mammoth Mountain  is the largest ski resort in California and just so happens to be built on a volcano. There are 3,500 acres of skiable area, which normally hosts millions of skiers and snowboarders each year. Keep in mind, lift-tickets can run upwards of $200, so check online for discounts and off-days.

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  • Hike the Canyons of Los Angeles

    WHERE: Los Angeles

    If you want some celebrity spotting while you work out, head to L.A.’s famous Runyon Canyon in the Hollywood Hills. Multiple trails are packed with the city’s bold and beautiful as they search for fresh air with their four-legged friends in tow.

    If you’d like to see another L.A. icon–the Hollywood sign–hiking there is a great option. The sign itself was originally erected in 1923 and read Hollywoodland. Today, there are multiple paths to reach the landmark. The easiest is a path that starts from the  Griffith Park Observatory , so you can get two landmarks in one visit. The others are slightly more strenuous and can be navigated using the sign’s official site.

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  • Spot Whales in Monterey

    WHERE: Monterey

    Monterey isn’t just the most expensive place to live in in the state, it’s also the best place to whale watch. Depending on the season, you can charter boats to witness gray, humpback, and blue whales spy hopping, breaching, and shooting water out of their spouts. The waters of Monterey are also prime locations for orcas, bottlenose dolphins, and more.

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  • Spend the Night at the Madonna Inn

    WHERE: San Luis Obispo

    San Luis Obispo is more or less in the middle of the state and is home to one of the most eccentric hotels in the country. The Madonna Inn was first opened in 1958, and contrary to popular belief, it wasn’t named for the pop star or Jesus’s mother. Construction magnate Alex Madonna built the property, which includes wholly unique themed rooms. There are rooms designed after countries like Italy and China and rooms for lovers like the Love Nest and Bridal Falls. There are rooms for Cavemen (literally) and golfers, antique car lovers, and more.

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  • Check Into One of Hollywood's Most Famous Hotels

    WHERE: Los Angeles

    This famous Hollywood hotspot was erected in 1927 and lays claim to being the first-ever host of the Academy Awards in 1929. Classic golden-era guests included Marilyn Monroe, Errol Flynn, and Montgomery Clift (all are rumored to be haunting the hallways at night). Now, the hotel features classic bars, restaurants curated by famed chef Nancy Silverton, and an always fun weekend pool scene.

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  • Visit a Landmark at the Mission Inn Hotel & Spa

    WHERE: Riverside

    The Inn is a National Historic Landmark that was first erected in Riverside in 1876 and is just as much a living museum as it is a hotel. Visited by families and tourists from around the world, the Inn has hosted everyone from presidents and movie stars to famous athletes and astronauts. If you want to see one of the most insane spectacles, come to the Inn during the winter months for the annual Festival of Lights. The hotel is draped in over five million lights and includes hundreds of animated figures and fun holiday offerings.

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  • Book a Room at the Hotel del Coronado

    WHERE: San Diego

    This uber-famous hotel has had starring roles in movies Some Like it Hot with Marilyn Monroe and My Blue Heaven with Steve Martin. Built in 1888, the hotel sits right on the water south of downtown San Diego and has hosted everyone from dignitaries and presidents to celebrities and famous athletes. The Victorian-style behemoth is one of San Diego’s quintessential landmarks and the perfect place to stay for families looking for fun in the sun.

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  • Window Shop on Rodeo Drive

    WHERE: Beverly Hills

    The mecca of the fashion world, Rodeo Drive is the dream shopping destination for the rich and famous. The chicest brands from Balenciaga and Ferragamo to Cartier and Fendi can be found along the tree-lined street as tourists gawk at prices and chauffeurs wait patiently for their employers. On the south end of the drive lies the famous Beverly Wilshire Hotel (featured in Pretty Woman ) and on the northern end is Gucci Osteria da Massimo Bottura, the ultimate Italian dining destination for fans of the Michelin-starred chef.

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  • Spend Your Money at Outlets

    WHERE: Cabazon

    If you’re headed to Palm Spring from Los Angeles (or vice versa), make sure to stop off here (most of the locals do). If you’re looking for deals, the Desert Hills Premium Outlets in Cabazon is your spot. High-end brands with amazing deals abound and you’ll find stores like Balmain, Celine, Christian Louboutin, Jimmy Choo, Valentino, and so much more for bargain rate prices.

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  • Stroll Union Square

    WHERE: San Francisco

    The ultimate fashion hub in San Francisco, Union Square is a public plaza that is surrounded by high-end stores like Tiffany & Co and Louis Vuitton, five-star hotels like the Sir Francis Drake and the St. Regis, and famous eateries like Boudin Bakery & Café and The Oak Room.

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  • Be Hip in Highland Park

    WHERE: Los Angeles

    L.A.’s most interesting neighborhood at the moment is in Highland Park. In-the-know locals have moved here in droves and spurred an uptick in new restaurants and shops. One of the mainstays is the Highland Park Bowl, a hip bowling alley with great beers and pizzas. Restaurant standouts include Belle’s Bagels, Taiwanese favorite Joy, Hippo for Italian authenticity, and Otoño for perfect Spanish cuisine. There’s no shortage of record stores and vintage clothing shops as well. Head over to Gimme Gimme Records for your vinyl needs, the Pop-Hop Books & Print for indie authors, and Dotter for a mix of housewares, toys, jewelry, and clothes.

    Courtesy of 1933 Group

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